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Vol 17 Number 4 - January 29, 2013

In this Issue:

  • "Welcome" - Dan Case, editor

  • Feature "How To Use Your Creative License to Make More Money this Year" by Jennifer Brown Banks

  • 15 Paying Markets - High, Medium, and Low

Want to contribute to this newsletter? We are a paying market. Read our guidelines for contributors here: http://www.writingfordollars.com/wfdguidelines.cfm


Welcome

You can follow me on Twitter: http://twitter.com/ChickenWriter and Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1041077107
I'll tweet you some interesting articles and markets!

Check out the article database. Our inventory of over 500 past articles from WFD is available to search and read. Find just the right information you need to make a few more bucks this year.

Don't forget our database of writer’s guidelines is readily available to everyone for FREE! All links have been checked within the last year (the date that they were last checked is listed) so you can be sure to have the most up-to-date information.

Here are the top-selling writing books at AWOCBooks.com - $1 SHIPPING on selected books! ($2.95 value)

  1. Magic Steps to Writing Success by Charles W. Sasser. $1 SHIPPING! Kindle edition available!
  2. Devoted to Writing! by Nancy Robinson Masters & Maurice Parsley Mallow $1 SHIPPING! Kindle edition available!
  3. Inspire! Writing from the Soul by Linda C. Apple $1 SHIPPING! Kindle edition available!
  4. Connect! A Simple Guide to Public Speaking for Writers by Linda C. Apple $1 SHIPPING! Kindle edition available!
  5. Preserving Family Legends for Future Generations by M. Carolyn Steele $1 SHIPPING! Kindle edition available!
  6. Who's Your Daddy? by Carolyn B. Leonard $1 SHIPPING! Kindle edition available!
  7. Be Your Own Book Doctor: So You Can Cure What Ails Your Writing by Robyn Conley. Kindle edition available!
  8. The Organized Writer is a Selling Writer by Kathryn Lay. $1 SHIPPING! Kindle edition available!
  9. The Complete Guide to Writing & Selling Magazine Articles 2nd Edition by Peggy Fielding and Dan Case. $1 SHIPPING! Kindle edition available!
  10. Confessing for Money 2nd Edition Writing and Selling to the SECRET Short Story Market by Peggy Fielding $1 SHIPPING! Kindle edition available!

Dan Case, editor
editor@writingfordollars.com (put WFD in the subject line)


How To Use Your Creative License to Make More Money this Year


by Jennifer Brown Banks

The craft of writing is sometimes a paradox. On one hand our “creative license” allows us to take certain liberties in our expression; and yet there are numerous grammatical rules and dictates, that if violated can brand us as amateurs, and prevent us from being published.

Still there is great truth to the expression, “Great risks bring great rewards.” And what I’ve discovered in my career is there are times to follow rules “to the letter” and times when pushing the envelope can lead to greater publication success and more money.

And you will too.

This piece will explore tips and techniques that I’ve used over the years, to break the rules and break the bank!

Here are some of the most common:

The Rule:

A query is required to break into most publications.

The Reality:

It often surprises people to know that I’ve written and sold over 600 articles, poems and commentary pieces to countless regional and national publications, without ever having written one. Sure, queries are a must for gaining entry into some of the major glossies. But the truth is, there are hundreds of quality publications that merely require a well-written piece, that is formatted properly and intelligently presented, in order to be accepted.

The key is to do the research to find out which ones align with your skills and areas of interest. Additionally, an LOI (letter of introduction) provides a great alternative.

The Rule:

Always follow writers’ guidelines as provided.

The Reality:

In most instances, this would hold true. But there are exceptions. Here’s an example. Some years ago, I responded to a call for submissions for an anthology on love.  I was geeked to get an opportunity to write on one of my favorite subjects, and I excitedly threw myself into the project with high expectations. There was only one problem. In penning my piece, I exceeded the established word count. Like a skilled surgeon, I kept at it, to attempt to trim away the fat. But the more I cut, the more it seemed I sacrificed the quality of the story and the substance. Frustrated, I decided to send it off. But, I attached a note to my submission letting the editor know of my situation, and asked her to please read it in its original version. The verdict? A month later, it was accepted and beat out hundreds of other entries to be included in this very popular title for women. Sometimes, you won’t know unless you try.   

The Rule:

Never miss a deadline.

The Reality:

It is true that you should never miss a deadline with an existing client. But, what if you learn of a writing job or opportunity after the close date posted? Should you miss out on potentially connecting, just because you discovered it in the 11th hour? No, you shouldn’t. Of course, it doesn’t guarantee that you’ll be considered for the position. But, it is worth a try, as sometimes organizations will allow themselves a little wiggle room for processing, and the “final” date is not always final. If this is the case, however, you’ll need to really bring your “A-game” to get their attention and to beat out the competition.

The Rule:

All writers should blog to establish their brand and build their platform.

The Reality:

Though it’s true that blogging these days is as hot as “Bieber fever,” blogging is not necessarily a “write of passage” for all scribes. Successful blogging requires a conversational tone, commitment, endless ideas, perseverance, and more time than most would realize. And let’s face it: “time is money”. Which is why it should be considered on an individual basis. Do you have what it takes to take it on? Would it be the best R.O.I. (return on investment)? Or would you be better served pursuing other projects? Assess accordingly.

Don’t let common myths keep you from making money and making progress. Use your creative license to be more strategic and to create endless opportunities this year.

© 2013 Jennifer Brown Banks

Jennifer Brown Banks is the former senior editor of Mahogany Magazine. She holds a B.A. in Business Management and blogs at Penandprosper.blogspot.com


15 Paying Markets
Updated or added in our database since January 22, 2013

High - Over $500

  • DRAFT Magazine - Guidelines:  Pays on publication.  Seeks nonfiction, columns/departments.  Subjects: Beer, beer/brewery news, trends and ideas. 

  • Yankee - Guidelines:  Pays on acceptance.  Seeks nonfiction, columns/departments, photos/artwork.  Subjects: New England, poetry, essays, gen interest, historical, humor, interview/profile, personal experience. 

  • Zoetrope All-Story - Guidelines:  Pays on publication.  Accepts simultaneous submissions.  Seeks fiction.  Subjects: Short stories and one-act plays. 


Medium - $125 - $500

  • Cottage Magazine - Guidelines:  Pays on publication.  Seeks nonfiction, columns/departments, photos/artwork.  Subjects: Cottage, cabin and property owners share a common interest in recreational living in Western Canada. 

  • Dollars & Sense - Guidelines:  Pays on acceptance.  Seeks nonfiction, photos/artwork.  Subjects: Economics, the environment, community organizing, urban conflict, inflation, unemployment.... 

  • Oregon Quarterly - Guidelines:  Pays on acceptance.  Seeks nonfiction, columns/departments, photos/artwork.  Subjects: Oregon, alumni profiles. 

  • Rutgers Magazine - Guidelines:  Pays on publication.  Seeks nonfiction.  Subjects: Rutgers issues and to Rutgers alumni, faculty, staff and students. 

  • Timber Home Living - Guidelines:  Pays on acceptance.  Seeks nonfiction, photos/artwork.  Subjects: Timber home living. 

  • Tropical Fish Hobbyist - Guidelines:  Pays on publication.  Seeks nonfiction, photos/artwork.  Subjects: Tropical fish. 

  • Veterinary Economics - Guidelines:  Pays on publication.  Seeks nonfiction, columns/departments, photos/artwork.  Subjects: Business of client and patient care for practicing veterinarians. 

  • The Washington Monthly - Guidelines:  Pays on publication.  Seeks nonfiction.  Subjects: Politics, government, culture and the media. 


Low - Less than $125

More paying markets

Classifieds
Make your writing sparkle. Write killer queries. Get published. Subscribe to Writing Etc. the free e-mag for writers. Receive the FREE e-booklet "Power Queries" by subscribing today. http://filbertpublishing.com
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